Menka Shivdasani and Aju Makhija- Mumbai, India

ORGANIZERS: Menka Shivdasani and Anju Makhija

CONTACT: poetsinmumbai@gmail.com

COMPLETE PDF OF MUMBAI EVENTS-Mumbai 100 thousand poets_30Nov2011_Final

In Mumbai, poets Menka Shivdasani and Anju Makhija will be organizing two events. The first of these, on September 23, 2011, will be a workshop for Adivasi children at the Bandanwadi school near Tara village close to Panvel, Raigad district, Maharashtra, where Adivasi poems/songs in Marathi will be explained and sung. The second will be a multilingual poetry reading on September 24, hosted by the Culture Beat, Mumbai Press Club, which will include peace music, and participation by poets writing in English, Marathi, Gujarati, Malayalam, Sindhi and other Indian languages. There will also be a film screening, organized by Rafique Baghdadi, and an Open Mike session, where Mumbaikars may present their poems related to the themes of peace and sustainability.

Anju Makhija, who has been working with Adivasi children in the Panvel area for many years, says: “These tribes, also called kathkaris, are losing their culture. They usually live in the hilly areas close to nature. Traditionally, they earn a living by cutting trees from nearby jungles and selling the wood to timber merchants. In recent times, they have been working as farm labourers and construction workers. Many of them live below the poverty line and have problems with alcoholism. They are not easily accepted by the mainstream culture and are isolated in many ways. Their children have now started going to local schools, but these Adivasis are fast losing their songs.” While the workshop takes place between 11 a.m and 1 p.m. on September 23, follow-up efforts will involve encouraging the children to collect more poems from their elders.

Mumbaikars are invited to send in their poems, artworks or any other relevant material on the themes of peace and sustainability. Write in to Menka Shivdasani and Anju Makhija at poetsinmumbai@gmail.com

 

PRESS RELEASE 9-13-2011

POEMS FOR PEACE

Poets around the world will participate in the momentous 100 Thousand Poets for Change movement on September 24 2011; in Mumbai, a multilingual poetry reading and a workshop for Adivasi children are being planned

Mumbai, September 13, 2011: Poets in 450 cities representing 95 countries are currently organizing the largest poetry reading in history with over 600 individual events scheduled to take place simultaneously on September 24, 2011, to promote environmental, social, and political change.  The historic global event, 100 Thousand Poets for Change, has been set in motion by Michael Rothenberg, a widely known poet, songwriter, editor of the online literary magazine Bigbridge.org and an environmental activist based in Northern California.

In Mumbai, poets Menka Shivdasani and Anju Makhija will be organizing two events. The first of these, on September 23, 2011, will be a workshop for Adivasi children at the Bandanwadi school near Tara village close to Panvel, Raigad district, Maharashtra, where Adivasi poems/songs in Marathi will be explained and sung, to acquaint the children with traditional songs. This will be led by Anil Vishwanatharama.

The second event will be a multilingual poetry reading on September 24, (4.30 p.m. onwards) hosted by Culture Beat, Mumbai Press Club. This will include a sitar recital by Madhusudan Kumar, and participation by poets writing in English, Marathi, Gujarati, Malayalam, Sindhi and other Indian languages. There will also be a film screening, organized by Rafique Baghdadi, and an Open Mike session, managed by Peter Griffin, Annie Zaidi and Manisha Lakhe of the writers’ forum                                      Caferati, where Mumbaikars may present their poems related to the themes of peace and sustainability.

“Poets, writers, artists, and humanitarians will create, perform, educate and demonstrate, in their individual communities, and decide their own specific area of focus for change within the overall framework of peace and sustainability, which is a major concern worldwide and the guiding principle for this global event,” says Rothenberg.

The events range from a poetry and peace gathering in strife-torn Kabul and Jalalabad to 20 collective poetic actions in Mexico City where poets, painters, filmmakers and musicians will spread the word of peace and non-violence throughout the city with day-long readings and workshops. There are 29 events planned in India, seven in Nigeria, 17 in Canada, 19 in Great Britain, five in China, three in Cuba and over 220 events in the United States.

The home page of the 100 Thousand Poets for Change website, www.100TPC.org, has been buzzing these last few weeks, and each city organizer and their community has an individual Event Location blog page on the website for posting written material, poetry, artwork, photos, and video to document this global mega-event across national borders.

Immediately following September 24th all documentation on the 100TPC.org website will be preserved by Stanford University in California, which has recognized 100 Thousand Poets for Change as an historical event, the largest poetry reading in history. They will archive the complete contents of the website, 100TPC.org, as part of their digital archiving program LOCKSS.

Mumbaikars are invited to send in their poems, artworks or any other relevant material on the themes of peace and sustainability. Write in to Menka Shivdasani and Anju Makhija at poetsinmumbai@gmail.com

For more information, contact:

Menka Shivdasani Anju Makhija

Mob: 9820101507                                           Mob: 9821070174

menka.shivdasani@gmail.com anjumakhija@hotmail.com

 

ADDITIONAL MUMBAI ARCHIVES: http://www.100tpcmedia.org/index.html


100 Thousand Poets for Change

P.O. Box 870

Guerneville, Ca 95446

Phone: 305-753-4569

http://www.100TPC.org

walterblue@bigbridge.org

 

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Comments

Menka Shivdasani and Aju Makhija- Mumbai, India — 7 Comments

  1. It is great to be part of this lively movement. One of the events that Anju Makhija and I are planning in Mumbai is an Adivasi poetry/songs workshop’ which will take place at Bandanwadi school, near Tara Village, Panvel District, Raigad. It will expose children to the poem/songs that have been collected from their own environment by a local school teacher in that area. These tribal children are fast losing their culture and we hope our efforts will start a process which will encourage them to rediscover their poetry.

  2. A poem by Pallavi Jayakar from Mumbai

    YEH HAI BAMBAI MERI JAAN

    Yeh hai Bambai meri jaan. Here, dreams lie awake
    and by-pass the night .If I am lured by page three fame
    you vie for centre spreads .Come let’s meet for old times’ sake.

    When the shape of your past maps out a face:
    A wandering tattoo, a smoldering kiss,
    a caress down a musty gully.
    Yeh hai Bambai meri jaan. Here dreams lie awake

    Listening to the chawl gossip, in the queue for water.
    My hand in your hand beneath the newspaper,
    we’ll tune in to each other, like last time.
    Come let’s meet for old times’ sake.

    Let Radhakaki pin her ear to the crack on the wall,
    put two and two together, when the radio-mirchi brawls
    with her hari naam.
    Yeh hai Bambai meri jaan. Here dreams lie awake

    With seasons dhamaka sale,and free exchange vouchers
    and spouses that recycle with yearly renewal offers,
    I am yet single and redeemable if you please
    Come let’s meet for old times’ sake.

    Ahead in the marathon, when the 8.15 VT local pulls in
    I’ll grab the corner seat, read your palm while others queue in.
    Yeh hai Bambai meri jaan. Here dreams lie awake
    Come let’s meet for old time’s sake
    One cutting chai at our old adda before we part again

    -©Pallavi Jayakar

  3. Mumbai-based Pushpa Moorjani shares her poem on bomb blasts…

    BOMB BLAST

    I and my Lord
    In silence we converse
    He listens to my words
    Softly spoken
    Each word a meaning
    of innermost feeling
    Lifting me up
    To an higher plane.
    The aura of his blessings
    Surrounds me
    Folding me
    Filling in all the voids
    I am at peace
    Curled up
    Soaked in
    Divine melodies
    Rejoicing
    Until

    A Loud Blast!

    Foolish Men!
    Why do you hate
    This silence so?

  4. Dr.V.S. Venkatvardan ran the Nehru Centre in Mumbai for many years. During the early days of the Poetry Circle in Mumbai (mid-80s) he had helped us organise a multilingual poetry reading ‘under the stars’ at the Planetarium in Mumbai. Suhas B. Naik-Satam sends in this poem on Dr Venkatvardan’s behalf

    JUST A SECOND

    “Time goes, you say? Ah No! Alas, Time stays, we go”—Austin Dobson

    IT WAS AN OVERLOADED Bus during the Rush Hour

    People stepping on each other’s toes

    And some adventurous ones hanging on the steps.

    The Bus was speeding like a Dinosaur that had eaten its Prey.

    As I was cogitating on Space, Time and Matter

    I heard someone say in; anguish,

    “Oh! I missed the Plane just by a second

    Now I have to waste a whole day”

    Unthinkingly I thought aloud

    “Time not wasted is Time wasted”

    What is time and what is a second?

    Little drops of seconds make the mighty ages

    In 100 years, out goes 3 billion seconds, one by one, tick by tick.

    If you doubt it count it, check it!

    You can accumulate matter and conquer space

    But can you store time in a box and use it at your will?

    No,”Fugit irreperabile tempus”

    What can you do in just a second?

    Drop a ball from five meters high

    It will touch the ground to bounce in a second.

    Even before the ball bounce

    Light will go round the earth seven times.

    An Olympic runner gallops 10 meters in a second

    A millisecond may make the difference between first and second.

    Just a second may make the difference between Joy and Sorrow

    Of an ebullient life or miserable existence.

    It just takes a second to say,”Second”.

    And so also to say ‘sorry’, ‘thanks’, ‘please’

    And a hundred other words of courtesy and etiquette.

    It takes less than a second to give a Hearty smile to make the whole world gay.

    But when your sweet heart says,

    “Wait a second dear”

    You very well know what it means!

    V.S. VENKATVARDAN

  5. Hello,

    I would like to submit the two poems below for “Poems for Peace”.
    Krishnakumar Sankaran – zigidum@gmail.com

    1) THIS POEM IS A RIOT

    You will not see it coming. This
    is what you must do. Hide your kids.
    Lock your locks. Bar your doors. Cock your guns.
    Unhood your hoodies. Learn not to flinch
    When glass shatters. Learn not to turn
    to cries for help. Keep your cctv’s
    Where all can see them.
    When it comes
    Shambling, throw jobs at it. Burn
    Your notes in its face. Send your women
    Out, breasts bared, tongues in heat. Roll
    Your eyes at rolling cameras. Call it beast
    When it swings your smoke bombs back at you.
    Call it criminalwhen it cracks your truncheons
    on its skull. when it reaches out with flaying arms
    leveling cities, call it brother.

    2) LIVING IN PEACE

    That is no well. Step away. It is the open muzzle
    Of an ancient gun. That line of dew on the tips of grass,
    a border class enemies cannot cross. Do not seek shelter
    In that town by the river. Their beds are mines; their women,
    Caltrops. It is not for us, it is not for you.
    You are a coward now. These wars do not concern you.
    There are cups to be filled, files to be stacked,
    Phone lines buzzing like angry bees. Someone must push
    the paper. Someone must stare at flaking paint
    While trucks fall off highways, while seeds die on planting.
    Someone must do nothing.
    It is alright, brother. I have long lived
    With the water in my blood, with the pale
    Opacity of riverwashed pebbles in my eyes,
    The languor of my floating limbs. It will take a while
    But you will learn to unclench those fists,
    To turn your eyes in to the fleshy dark of sockets,
    To slow the drumming of your heart. Brother,
    You will learn a sun that does not sink in blood;
    You will know the silence of a floating corpse.

  6. And here is a poem from Vladimir Milenkovic (sonbote@hotmail.com), who wanted to know if it was possible to participate even if one was not from India.

    “I’m from Serbia, but currently situated in Greece for work (summer job),” he says. “The reason I wanted to send the poem is cause it was inspired by Vedas, which are a big part of India’s heritage. I originally wrote it in English, but have a version in Greek.

    MAN OF EARTH

    I am a dream of trees – lost child of water.
    I am the brother of summer gales – thought in motion.

    I am the one who can feel the Sun inside,
    one who thinks ‘nihil’ yet loves all,
    one who whispers to moonlight
    and caresses the stars.

    I will offer my heart to those who will love her
    I will offer my eyes to those who want to heal her
    Her – Our blue home, our gentle Earth.

    And you, you are my brother and my sister
    My friend and my joy
    For on this world of wonders
    You too are with me
    Sharing this gem
    Living this miracle of being.
    You, a speck in the Milky Way
    A giant among the pebbles
    No greater than an ant
    No smaller than a star.

    One body
    Vibrating with beauty
    One mind
    Soaring to infinity:

    We are the Universe.

    Regards,

    Vladimir

  7. [file]http://www.bigbridge.org/100thousandpoetsforchange/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/100thousandpoets_30Nov2011_Finalforupload.pdf[/file]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>