Rio Grande Valley, Texas

ORGANIZER: Daniel Garcia Ordaz

CONTACT: wegotwords@hotmail.com OR poetmariachi@hotmail.com

Poetry Flash Mob: 100 Thousand Poets For Change (Global Event)

Time
Saturday, September 24 · 8:00pm - 10:00pm

Location
McAllen Creative Incubator 

1001 S. 16th Street
McAllen, Texas

Created By

More Info
The Rio Grande Valley will be one of the hosts and participants of the global event, “100 Thousand Poets For Change,” being held simultaneously on Sept. 24 in 650 cities and 95 countries as part of the largest poetry reading in history to promote environmental, social, and political change. 

A “flash mob poetry reading” is planned for 8 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24, at the McAllen Creative Incubator (1001 S. 16th St., McAllen, Texas.)

Poets reading in the Valley will be focusing on local environmental issues and speaking against the proposed expansion of the Border Wall, which is cutting off access to ecotourism for the region as well as cutting off access to water for ocelots and other felines and other mammals, cactus wrens and other birds, such as chachalacas.

For more information, contact Valley event coordinator Daniel García Ordaz at poetmariachi@hotmail.com. For information about 100ThousandPoetsForChange visit the site @ http://www.bigbridge.org/100thousandpoetsforchange/

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    Rio Grande Valley, Texas — 13 Comments

    1. Flash Poetry Reading as part of 100 Thousand Poets For Change–an international event happening simultaneously across the globe. Rio Grande Valley event will be to protest Border Wall & focus on environmental issues in RGV via poetry on Saturday, Sept. 24 @ 8 p.m. Looking at Mission location. Let me know if y’all can make it. Contact Daniel Garcia Ordaz, the organizer for local event. Location ToBeAnnounced soon. REPOST!

    2. Sept. 21, 2011
      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

      The Rio Grande Valley will be one of the hosts and participants of the global event, “100 Thousand Poets For Change,” being held simultaneously on Sept. 24 in 350 cities and 70 countries as part of the largest poetry reading in history to promote environmental, social, and political change.

      A “flash mob poetry reading” is planned for 8 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 24, at the McAllen Creative Incubator (1001 S. 16th St., McAllen, Texas.)

      Poets reading in the Valley will be focusing on local environmental issues and speaking against the proposed expansion of the Border Wall, which is cutting off access to ecotourism for the region as well as cutting off access to water for ocelots and other felines and mammals, cactus wrens and other birds, such as chachalacas.

      For more information, contact Valley event coordinator Daniel García Ordaz at poetmariachi@hotmail.com.

    3. Enseñanzas Ancestrales.

      Vengo de tierras ancestrales
      Mi cultura me proclama,
      El Aztlan perdido y mitológico
      Existe en mi corazón.

      Vengo de tierras limpias,
      Vengo de tierras espirituales,
      Vengo de tierras cultivables
      Que provienen desde el corazón
      el problema fue “Nuestra Evolución”
      Que daño nuestro Planeta GAIA
      Olvidamos de donde provenimos
      Adonde partiremos

      Tenemos la enseñanza de nuestros ancestros
      Que está en nuestros adentros
      Cuando compartiremos esa enseñanza
      A nuestros nietos
      Como fue ensenada
      A nuestros adeptos.

      Nuestra tierra nos necesita
      Nuestra tierra nos aclama
      Nos pide por compasión
      Para los nuestros
      Despertemos,
      Sin ser ineptos.

      (c) 2011 by Monica Ramirez, participant of inaugural 100 Thousand Poets For Change, Rio Grande Valley

    4. Readings for the first-ever 100 Thousand Poets For Change (www.100TPC.org)–a global event focused on social change–were held on Sept. 24, 2011 at over 700 events in 95 countries. This event set a world record as the largest poetry reading in history. In the coming days we’ll be uploading documents–such as photos, fliers, and poems–that will be archived by Stanford University, in recognition of significant Web-based events; i.e., Stanford archives important Web sites for posterity.

      The Rio Grande Valley focused on environmental issues and protesting the proposed expansion to the Border Wall. We had a cozy crowd, but it allowed us to make new friendships, make new connections, and start conversations about future collaborations between artists, activists, organizers, teachers, and advocates.

      Our readers included Katie Hoerth, Kate McSwain, Kamala Platt, Tiffany Anderson, Erika Said, Jose A. Cardenas, Rossy Lima, Monica Ramirez, and Daniel Garcia Ordaz–local event organizer.

      We met at the McAllen Creative Incubator. The audienc also included Chris Pauley, a metal sculptor from Washington State now in the Valley, Rachel Udow, Kenton White, Lynn Brezosky, Gerald Padilla, Michael Gerleman, Sandra Cano, Cheli Sierra, and Alan Padilla, among others. Lady Mariposa was also with us, in spirit, along with several other poets who weren’t able to make it due to previous committments or other issues. We will definitely be back again next year!

      Special thanks to Jamie Tabak and Sunfish Records for your support.

      Michael Rothenberg, global event creator, has already decided to begin planning to make this an annual event. Join us!

    5. empty lot next door

      empty lot next door, I knock baseball cores out of worn

      leather with a wooden bat, careful of camouflaged

      art, eggs in a killdeer nest, precocial plovers

      imitating their parents’ movements the next day,

      tripping over

      silverleaf nightshade, xeric upright plants

      of dusty green-grey leaves supporting dry flowers–shriveled

      bright purple petals framing strong yellow stamens.

      I pick them because they’re pretty. thorns stick my thumb.

      the plant smells light brown like the dirt around, hardly

      any green. I slice moons into the berries, small and striped

      like dwarf melons. My mom has told me not to eat them

      and she was right. My native roots couldn’t warn me

      these were only used for coagulating milk and tanning hides.

      Killdeers, 2 inches tall, tumble down a curb,

      fuzz smaller than the pebbles

      where they stand in height like a man

      compares to an 18-foot concrete levee, slash border wall.1

      I trespass over the wooden gate behind the empty lot next door.

      climbing over is more fun than climbing through

      the large triangular gaps where my 9 year old body still fits.

      tiptoe ‘round that fresh horse signature scent, approach my

      true pot of gold after arching over the fence–

      the magnificent brown horses.

      powerful muscles, powerful hooves, beautiful even as they kick

      my knee backwards and I

      step back in surprise. Back when

      flocks of lime green parrots in the RGV were also a surprise, I

      admire the low mesquite tree, marvel

      at the verdant branches’ squawking silhouette

      of leaves, burgeoning seemingly overnight but not as quick

      as the feathery foliage flew away, like today–

      the low mesquite trees,

      the magnificent horses,

      the modest fence

      are all gone,

      but the parrots

      and the silverleaf nightshade

      have multiplied.

      1 I refer to the concrete levee system and border wall on the United States side of the Rio Grande River in south Texas as Emmy Pérez did in her essay presented at the AWP conference in Washington D.C. on February 3, 2011.

      (c) 2011 by Tiffany Cerese Anderson, participant of inaugural 100 Thousand Poets For Change, Rio Grande Valley

    6. In America
      (a found poem from an article about Jim Henson’s Muppets and Sesame Street)

      technology has evolved
      racist people have not

      superimposed images on maps
      they created of lands they did not

      real people have also appeared
      on this continent

      a regular paradise
      in the Land of the Gorch

      with no puppeteer in sight
      no papers

      only their underwear and hopes—
      the Electric Mayhem continues

      © Daniel García Ordaz, organizer of inaugural 100 Thousand Poets For Change, Rio Grande Valley

    7. The New Colossus

      Though data demands that I exist
      My mathematics do not compute
      Programmed to divide
      Instead I subtract

      I keep the cats of prey encaged
      I keep the flightless birds enraged

      My skin, it shines,
      since no one climbs
      I give no life
      I am ashamed

      No songs I raise
      No waters flow
      I block the way
      I seal the door

      I find solace in the sighs of the wind
      caressing my beaded seams
      I find mercy in the beating sun
      Tanning my hide, my dying dreams

      I cry no peals of joy at church
      Nor “slip the surly bonds of earth”
      I sail no fair-wind open sea
      I live to kill
      In infamy

      Not a bridge
      Not a tower
      Not a soul
      Just a briar

      I hide my lamp
      Beside the golden door
      Since those like you
      Aren’t welcome anymore.

      © Daniel García Ordaz, organizer of inaugural 100 Thousand Poets For Change, Rio Grande Valley

    8. [file]http://www.bigbridge.org/100thousandpoetsforchange/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/100ThousandPoets2011ElManana.pdf[/file]

      This is a PDF of an article/newspaper coverage after the event held in the Rio Grande Valley of deep South Texas; aticle is from a Reynosa, Mexico, newspaper written by a reporter who is also a poet who participated in the event, Erika Said–pronounced (Saw-Eed). Article is at bottom right of PDF; photograph is of award-winning poet Katie Hoerth performing one of her pieces. Article title: Participan poetas en movimiento histórico.

    9. Control

      Why is it that men work so hard to control
      The Free
      Freedom
      The Soul
      A chastity belt was locked in place
      To control a woman’s freedom
      The key was kept by him
      From her
      Have you ever seen these belts of metal
      So cruel, harsh, demeaning deadly
      Many women died from this torture
      Yet still we have not learned

      A huge metal chastity belt
      Slowly encircles our Gaia, our land, our home
      to control
      The Free
      Freedom
      The Soul
      So cruel, harsh, demeaning, deadly
      Yet still we have not learned
      Yet still we have not learned

      (c) Kate McSwain, a reader at the Rio Grande Valley event of the inaugural 100TPC, held in McAllen, Texas!

    10. A QUIEN CRUZÓ EL RÍO BRAVO Y NO VOLVIÓ

      Venía ridícula el hambre
      ridícula la sed
      de cerveza
      de ser alguien
      venían estas ganas hirvientes de vaticinar el desastre
      y reconstruirlo en fragmentos donde sólo cabe el miedo

      El silencio fluyó / río abajo
      venía ridículo el viento
      mientras tú te inmiscuías en su corriente de boca
      de profundidad traidora

      Ridículo el deseo de dinero
      de ser alguien
      venían estas ganas insómnicas
      por pasar al otro lado
      y caminar como brújula
      al norte sin torcer el cuello
      sin sentir el vértigo de lluvia
      que se traga a quien va tocando

      Ridícula la compasión
      a tus hijos que gemían
      de ganas / ridícula el ansia
      por pasar al otro lado

      El cielo fue tu único techo
      el río un murmullo de voces
      que te rodeó de lamentos
      mientras tu cuerpo se ahogaba

      E ibas perdiendo la vida
      ridículo el nerviosismo en aquél último instante
      en que despertaste a la orilla de otro río de aguas mansas
      un lugar sin fronteras
      el confín de lo que vive
      el principio de lo que no muere
      perdido en el correr del agua

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